Power Points

Power Points

Power Points

Power Points

Power Points

Power Points

SAD chart

SAD chart

SAD chart

SAD chart

SAD chart

SAD chart

Power Points

SAD chart

Chemical Plant Explosion

Tornado

Workplace Shooting

Stadium Bombing

Commuter Airplane Crash

Rail - Subway Accident

Tour Bus Accident

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Band Camp Heat Emergency

Power Points

SAD chart

Commuter/Freight Train Collision  SAD chart

MC 306 Tanker Accident SAD chart

Criswell Chemical Explosion SAD chart

 This is a traditional large scale hazardous materials incident response exercise with three separate scenarios, taught as part of FEMA's Integrated Emergency Management Course (IEMC) curriculum, and  run by controllers in the FEMA IEMC exercise facility. Students (often the full complement of emergency management and public official leaders from a targeted community) are provided two days of initial training in hazardous materials, ICS, and related response roles and functions. Then students are challenged to  perform their professional roles in the fictional response to three significant hazardous materials emergencies. Displayed here are the hazardous materails instructional materials, the Controller Handbook and MSELs (Master Scenario Events List) to guide conducting the three simulations, and SAD (Situational Awareness Display) charts for each of the three scenarios. The MSELs include directions for providing "injects" to modify incident conditions based upon student actions as each scenario progresses. The SAD charts are used to provide students with clarification of community exposure information and priority risk areas in the fictional "Central City" used in the scenarios, at the level of exposure awareness students would probably have if dealing with similar incidents in their home communities. 

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The major Incident e-Simulations series is a  program prototype that was designed to provide lessons learned to response audiences who are not typically reached by formal after action written reports, but who nonetheless may encounter similar incidents and need to be prepared to handle them properly. Because most of these major incidents are under litigation for many years, it is often difficult to openly examine responder actions and decisions. In order to avoid this,  the e-Simulations provide similar but fictionalized incident accounts in which correct command decision-making is modeled, regardless of errors that may or may not have occurred in the original incident. The e-simulations are formatted as semi-theatrical videos with lessons learned summaries. The programs can run either as stand-alone videos or on an LMS with optional student interaction opportunities. This sample is a short video clip excerpt from an e-simulation replicating a major train accident with lethal chlorine gas release that occured in Graniteville, NC. In this tragedy, 9 people were killed and more than 550 injured from exposure to the gas.  

In the e-simulation, correct command decision-making is modeled regarding correctly using  ICS, 

building inclusive unified command, establishing correct incident priorities with sound

protective action strategies, and initiating well coordinated evacuation and public protection.

EMS Mass Casualty Simulations/Exercises

Hazardous Materials Simulations: IEMC Exercises

Major Incident E-Simulations: Graniteville

Training simulations and exercises can be done in a wide variety of formats, but all focus on placing the student in one way or another into an artificial experience that replicates the student's real work environment, issues and challenges.  Three examples for which I was the instructional designer of different simulation and/or exercise techniques for the emergency services audience are displayed below. The first is a traditional large scale hazardous materials incident response exercise with three separate sceanrios, and run by controllers in a large community team exercise facility. Elements displayed include pre-exercise instruction, controller directions and injects to be provided to students based upon student performance, and appropriate graphic situational awareness displays for each of the three scenarios. The second is an online simulation that provides a simulated depiction of a response to a major emergency from first call to incident termination, and provides detailed performance modeling of correct command actions that are being taught as correct procedures to be taken to handle the emergency. The third is a variation of the traditional incident response exercise targeting EMS incident commanders, teaching them to handle a series of different mass casualty incidents progressing from moderately challenging to highly challenging. These exercises are shorter in duration, have more graphic powerpoint presentations of each incident set-up, and are supported by progressive graphic-based situational awareness displays to guide the students in the different breakout rooms.

Portfolio Index

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Additional samples and information on request.

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Simulation and Exercise Materials

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William D. Lewis    717-357-1209   workforward@hotmail.com

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This training focused on preparing Emergency Medical Services officers to manage and command large mass casualty incidents. The application portion of the training provided  a variation of the traditional incident response exercise that included the use of "triage cards" to represent the patients being handled and emphasized the management  and tracking of a large number of patients through rescue, patient assessment, initial care, preparation for transport, and transport. The students were presented with a rapic progression of incidents over two days from moderately challenging to highly challenging and complex, as they developed and demonstrated requisite skill in the coordination and management tasks assigned. Each exercise was initiated with a simple power point presentation, students were quickly moved into separate workrooms with only radio communications with other student groups, and initial conditions were were provided in large Situationial Awareness Display (SAD) wall charts in each of the breakout rooms for students to refer to and write on as the incident progressed.  Each incident simulation had a formal large room debrief to help students self-assess each groups performance at the end of the simulation, before starting the next incident. Displayed below for review are the power point presentations setting up each incident and the appropriate incident SAD charts.